Video Title: Introduction to Buffalo Bayou Backhand

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RULES OF THE ROAD

Game Objective

In this game, we add the dealer hand  which requires a lot more strategy to win.  Both the player's hand and the dealer's hand must now compete against each other for advantage in order to claim victory!  

How to Play & Terms You Should Know

  1. All existing rules for Backhand, the card game will be observed in this invention, except where rule modifications are expressly noted in this document.
  2. The dealer is dealt three show cards face up, from right to left first. These show cards make up the dealer hand and are never replaced or substituted under any circumstances during the hand. The player hand is then dealt on the row below the dealer hand, from right to left, face up and positioned adjacent to the bottom left hand corner of the first dealer hand show card starting from the left. (Download rules below for images and diagrams).
  3. The dealer hand is dealt in the beginning of the hand and remain in place until the hand is over. Dealer show cards are positioned on the row above the player’s first two dealt cards, but start just after the second card (from the right) in the player’s hand on the row below. 
  4. Initial hand value – The player's initial hand value is calculated by adding the numerical values of the first two cards dealt to the player from the deck.    Note: As in backhand, suits still have no impact on the game.
  5. Player Total – This is the added numerical values of all the cards dealt to the player, except for the last card dealt to the player. Discarded initial player aces and discarded push hands are not counted. The backhand card is never included in the ‘player total’.
  6. Total Hand Value – This is the sum total numerical value of all the cards dealt to the player including the initial player hand, the backhand card and any hit cards. This is used to determine if/when the player has busted or not.
  7. Dealer Total – The dealer total is the added numerical values of the last card dealt to the player, and the dealer show card directly above it. The dealer total is compared to the player total throughout the hand to determine who has the advantage in the hand. Once the backhand card is dealt, the player total and dealer totals are counted and whoever has the highest total will win the hand. If both the player and dealer totals are of equal value after the backhand card is played, the hand will result in a stalemate (no winner) and the hand is over. In the case of a five card hand, the player would win according to existing backhand rules. This is still the case in Buffalo Bayou backhand.
  8. As mentioned earlier, every time a card is dealt to the player (either a hit card or a backhand card) the player total and dealer totals are compared to determine the advantage in the hand. Backhand rules still apply to hit cards, so in this invention if the hit card causes the player hand to bust, the player loses the hand. If it doesn’t, the player is presented the option to take another hit card or call backhand. A player shall not be dealt more than five cards in a hand, including the backhand card. If the player successfully hits to five cards without busting, the player wins the hand. If the hit card is an ace, it is valued at 1 when calculating the player total hand value and at 1 or 11 when calculating the dealer total. This is another rule modification with respect to the value of aces. In backhand, the ace is always valued at 1. But in Buffalo Bayou backhand, the value of the ace depends on what it is being used to calculate.
  9. In the case of a push hand, the player still has the option to either take a hit card or push the hand away for another hand. If the player decides to play the push hand by taking a hit card, the hit card is used to calculate both the player total and the dealer total. If the hit card in said push hand is an ace, the ace is valued at 1 when calculating the player’s total hand value and 1 or 11 when calculating the dealer total (to the dealer's advantage). Whatever the hit card turns out to be, if the player has the advantage, the player wins the push hand. If the dealer has the advantage, the dealer wins the push hand. 
  10. If the player decides to play a push hand in Buffalo Bayou backhand, the player shall only be dealt one card.  If the player's hand busts, the player loses the push hand.

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ACES

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Aces are used for many things in this game and their value depends on their use.

  1. When an ace is dealt as a dealer’s show card, it can be valued at 1 or 11, to the dealer’s advantage
  2. Dealer aces are any aces dealt during the game which are not a part of the initial player hand.
  3. If a backhand card is an ace, it’s valued at 1 or 11, which ever value gives the advantage to the dealer when calculating the dealer total; but valued at only 1 for the player when calculating the player’s total hand value.
  4. If a hit card is an ace, it’s valued at 1 or 11, which ever value gives the advantage to the dealer when calculating the dealer total; but valued at only 1 for the player when calculating the player’s total hand value.
  5. Player aces are aces that are a part of the initial player hand after the Ace Rule is satisfied. Player aces are always valued at 1.
  6. Initial player aces are aces that are contained in the initial player hand prior to the Ace Rule being satisfied. Therefore, they are not the same as player aces. Per the Ace Rule, initial player aces are discarded and replaced immediately after the initial player hand is dealt.

Buffalo Bayou Examples

Introduction to Buffalo Bayou Backhand

Example 1 - Buffalo Bayou Backhand basics

Example 2 - Lost hand on a successful backhand play.

Example 3 - Five card hand.

Example 4 - Dealer aces, Part 1

Example 5 - Dealer aces, Part 2

Example 6 - Dealer aces, Part 3.

Example 7 - Dealer aces, Part 4.

Example 8 - Live Buffalo Bayou hands played here.

Example 9 - Live Buffalo Bayou hands played here (Part 2).

Example 10 - Live Buffalo Bayou hands played here (Part 3).

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